• Americans are living longer, which means more time with the grandchildren, more time to travel to those places you didn’t see when you were younger and more time to devote to leaving your mark on the world. But a longer life expectancy also comes with problems. At least 70 percent of Americans will eventually watch as an aging loved one’s


  • There comes that profound moment when you realize your parents are really aging. It may be a slow process–a minor surgery here, a slip of the mind there–and then it all changes. And when it does, you realize your roles are about to reverse. Helping aging parents prepare for assisted living is a sensitive subject on many levels. Being prepared


  • mom fell and broke her hip. She wants to recuperate at home, but is that a realistic option? Dad shouldn’t be driving any longer and is showing signs of dementia. Should we move him into an assisted living facility? Are there alternatives? And where’s the money to pay for all of this going to come from? Elder care is fast


  • The pressures are mounting for middle-aged adults caring for the physical and financial needs of both their underage children and their aging parents. “We all have plans for caring for our parents. Maybe “hopes” is a better word,” comments CPA and forensic accountant David Wood. “If we have a hopeful plan, it is wise to remember the old war adage


  • I come from a family of 11 siblings, raised in rural Minnesota. Our parents had been married for 62 years when dad passed away in 2011 after years of declining health. Mom was frail, but we weren’t prepared to lose her 10 months later. In hindsight, we realize that if we had talked with them about their finances early on,